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Bibliography, Howard Pease

For our library holdings, please see the catalogue entries for Howard Pease.

Howard Pease (1894 - 1974) wrote from personal experience reflected in how Tod Moran (about 15 of his works were based upon the character William Todhunter Moran) first started to sea, as a summer job while he was attending Stanford University in Palo Alto CA.

Even as a small boy the sea always attracted Howard Pease. Maybe because he lived on inland soil, out of sight of the fogs of the coast, yet on a river that flowed into San Francisco Bay. Born in Stockton, California, he finished high school there and then entered Stanford University.

At the end of his freshman year he found himself enlisted in a university unit which was sent early to France. Two years later he returned to Stanford where he remained off and on until graduation.

Writing had been Mr. Pease's main object and interest ever since the sixth grade and because he had no wish to write and starve in a garret, he now chose teaching as a profession, since it gave him long vacations in which to work at his typewriter.

The sea, too, still attracted him. One summer he shipped out as a wiper in the engine room of a freighter-one of the few ship jobs an inexperienced youth can get.

During Mr. Pease's first year of teaching school he started The Tattooed Man. It was the result of two voyages, together with a walking trip from Marseilles along the coast to Italy. The Jinx Ship was the result of another voyage. His book, The Ship Without a Crew, was written after a tropical winter in Tahiti and Highroad to Adventure after an automobile trip along the Pan-American Highway to Mexico.

With his wife and son, Mr. Pease lived in San Francisco on a hill near the Golden Gate, where he devoted all his working hours to writing.

Bibliography:

Text Sub-title or description Year Publisher
The Tattooed Man a tale of strange adventures, befalling Tod Moran, mess boy of the tramp steamer "Araby," upon his first voyage from San Francisco to Genoa, via the Panama canal, a teenage boy goes in search of his missing shipping company older brother. The hero takes a job as a mess boy, and later stoker on a freighter out of San Francisco bound for Marseilles. It is a vividly realistic portrayal of life aboard tramp freighters in the inter-war years. Also interesting is the treatment of drug addiction in the days when it wasn't so painfully common 1926 New York Doubleday, Doran & Co Inc
The Jinx Ship the dark adventure that befell Tod Moran when he shipped as fireman aboard the tramp steamer "Congo", bound out of New York for Caribbean ports 1927 Doubleday & Co. Garden City, NY
Shanghai Passage being a tale of mystery and adventure on the high seas in which Stuart Ormsby is shanghaied aboard the tramp steamer "Nanking" bound for ports on the China coast 1929 Doubleday & Co. Garden City, NY
The Gypsy Caravan Betty and Joe travel with the gypsies and meet Robin Hood, Richard the Lionhearted, Roland and others. 1930 Garden City/NY: Doubleday
Secret Cargo the story of Larry Matthews and his dog Sambo, forecastle mates on the tramp steamer "Creole Trader", New Orleans to the South Seas 1931 Garden City Doubleday & Company
The Ship Without a Crew the strange adventures of Tod Moran, third mate of the tramp steamer "Araby" 1934 Garden City, N. Y., Doubleday, Doran & Company
Wind in the Rigging an adventurous voyage of Tod Moran on the tramp steamer "Sumatra," New York to North Africa 1935 NY Doubleday, Doran & Co
Hurricane Weather yachting in the South Seas 1936 Doubleday, Doran & Co., Inc
Foghorns a story of labour troubles on the San Francisco water front 1937 New York Doubleday Doran
Captain Binnacle   1938 Dodd, Mead & Company, New York
Jungle River American boy searching for his lost father in the New Guinea jungle 1938 New York Doubleday, Doran & Co Inc
Highroad to adventure Tod Moran, trip to Mexico and a silver mine mystery 1939 New York Doubleday, Doran & Co Inc
Long wharf story of young San Francisco 1939 New York, Dodd, Mead & company
The Black Tanker A Stanford student gets word that his father, a doctor working in China, has been seriously injured in a Japanese bombing raid. The only way he can get to China is to sign on as an engine wiper on the tanker ZAMBORA, with Captain Jarvis and mate Tod Moran, carrying oil to the Japanese bases in China. There is a murder on board, a storm at sea, and some adventures with the Japanese and Chinese after they arrive. Seen through American political neutrality with a strong distaste for Japanese Imperialism 1941 New York Doubleday, Doran & Co Inc
Night Boat and other Tod Moran mysteries 1942 Doubleday, Doran and Co. Garden City,
Thunderbolt House Set in Stockton, the San Francisco earthquake 1944 Doubleday & Company NY
Heart of Danger a tale of adventure on land and sea with Tod Moran, third mate of the tramp steamer "Araby" 1946 Doubleday, Doran and Co. NY
Bound for Singapore Being a True and Faithful Account of the Making of an Adventurer 1948 New York Doubleday, Doran & Co Inc
Dark Adventure While hitchhiking from Illinois to take a job in his uncle's grocery store in California, Johnny Stevens is left unconscious by the roadside, stripped of his identification and his memory. Rescued by a kindly couple in a trailer, Johnny runs away to find his past. [Republished by Bantam Books, 1953, as Road Kid, perhaps "over-sensationalized" by its cover art as marijuana is mentioned.] 1950 Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday
Captain of the Araby the story of a voyage, a Tod Moran book, and the Capt. of the title is a man he sails with in most of the books 1953 NY: Doubleday & Co., Inc
Shipwreck the strange adventures of Renny Mitchum, mess boy of the trading schooner "Samarang" 1957 NY: Doubleday & Co., Inc
Mystery on Telegraph Hill Tod Moran 1961 NY: Doubleday & Co., Inc

Other "Pease" mentions:

Several of the Society's early Volumes of the Journal of the [Royal] Cruising Club belonged to and are signed by a J.G. Pease. Relationship, if any, unknown.

Captain "Bully" Hayes (William Henry Hayes, 1827 or 1829 – 1877) (see Bully Hayes, South Sea Pirate by Alfred Lubbock) was arrested in 1870 by the English Consul at Samoa for piracy. There being no prison in this delightful island, the Consul ran Hayes's ship on shore, and waited for a Navy ship to call and take his prisoner away. Hayes spent his time, while under open arrest, he was the life and soul of native picnic parties. When off duty he was a man of great charm of manner and a favourite with the ladies. Presently Captain Pease, another pirate, arrived in an armed ship with a Malay crew. Hayes and Pease quarrelled violently, and the Consul had great trouble to keep the two pirates from coming to blows. This animosity was all a sham to throw dust in the Consul's eyes, for one night Hayes smuggled Pease on board his ship and sailed away. Relationship, if any, unknown.

There was a Captain William Cooke Pease from Martha's Vineyard - see: Florence Kern, Captain Pease U. S. Coast Guard Pioneer, Alised Enterprises, Bethesda, Maryland, 1982. Relationship, if any, unknown

 

Revised: 11 November 2013